Four named to state wildlife commission; funding tops the list

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Wildlife management has many facets and none of it is free. Hunting and fishing licenses still pay two-thirds of the bills for Colorado Parks and Wildlife. 

Gov. John Hickenlooper has added four new members, three from the Western Slope, to the Colorado Wildlife Commission.

Among the newest members of the 11-person panel are former Grand Junction mayor Jim Spehar; Carrie Besnette Hauser, president and CEO of Colorado Community College in Glenwood Springs; Marie E. Haskett, owner of JML Outfitters near Meeker, the 2016 COA Outfitter of the Year; and Xcel Energy vice-president Marvin Edward McDaniel of Sedalia. Read the entire news release here.

The biggest challenge facing the wildlife commission is what the agency terms “the uncertain outlook for hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation in the face of severe funding challenges.”

It’s not just fewer fish stocked in lakes and streams or the possible loss of access to walk-in hunting and fishing areas or maybe curtailing or closing state parks. It’s what Northwest Regional Manager JT Romatzke described as the potential loss of  “a critical part of Colorado’s heritage.”

This summer, CPW leadership has been hosting a series of meeting statewide to discuss funding options after a proposal to increase the cost of hunting and fishing license and raise park fees was killed last May in the Senate Finance Committee.

It’s no secret Colorado Parks and Wildlife, which has not had a fee increase in 12 years, is operating on a deficit and since 2009 has lost 50 positions and cut $40 million from its operating budget.

“Operating with a strained budget is not just a problem for the agency, it’s a problem for everyone in this state, whether you hunt, hike, fish, camp or boat, or depend on the revenue these activities generate for businesses and the state’s economy,” Katie Lanter,  Policy and Planning Supervisor for Parks and Wildlife, said in a CPW statement. “The public will need to be heavily involved and help decide how the management of some of Colorado’s most important natural resources will be funded so they will be available for future generations.”

The agency gets no general-fund tax dollars. Funding comes mostly from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses and a smaller portion a share of the lottery and restricted federal excise taxes on hunting and fishing equipment.

Lanter said that funding “is only one natural resource management challenge” facing the CPW. There also is the prospect that Colorado’s population may grow by 25 million people in the next 25 years, adding to the pressure already felt by wildlife and state recreation areas. And of that population growth, it’s expected that by 2040 three times as many Coloradans will be 65 or over and potentially not buying fishing or hunting licenses.

“The public will have to decide what’s important to them in terms of wildlife and parks management – more cuts and less opportunity, or find a way to increase operating revenue so that we can manage at the level expected by Coloradans.” said Northwest Regional Manager JT Romatzke. “I can say that this agency has had to undergo severe belt-tightening and there is little room for more without severely crimping it’s mission.

“We are at a crossroads and we need to find an effective solution quickly, or risk losing a critical part of Colorado’s heritage,” Romatzke said.

 

 

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CPW gets its poacher: Californian pinned with wildlife crimes

Here is something we can’t hear often enough: Colorado Parks and Wildlife stuck a California poacher with a pile of wildlife violations and now he faces not only big-time fines but also the potential loss of his hunting and fishing privileges.

Read the press release here.

According to CPW, Kyle Odle, 29, of Menifee, Calif., not only is an egregious repeat offender (many of the charges against him include the words “multiple counts”) but a Marine veteran who falsified his status as a vet to assist in committing wildlife crimes.

After reading the litany of charges against this clown, it’s hard to figure out if there is any  wildlife interest he didn’t offend. Properly licensed hunters, both resident and nonresident? Check. Vets? Check. Landowners? Check. Guides and outfits? Check. Biologists and mule deer conservation groups trying to restore Colorado’s mule deer? Check. License agents? Check. And so on.

Odle was sentenced to pay around $11,000 in fines (plus a $5,500 reimbursement to hunters he cheated by pretending to be a legal guide) and, pending a hearing, may lose his hunting and fishing privileges for life in this and 42 other states.

That he escaped jail time for potential felony charges is a pity since he deserves some time alone. Not that he would likely spend it thinking of where he went wrong, but sticking a felony charge (and its restrictions on owning firearms) on his record would insure he wouldn’t be able to hunt again.

The finding of the 14th Judicial District Court in Moffat County comes as good news because getting convictions on wildlife crimes has never been easy. Especially so in metropolitan areas where courts have backed-up dockets filled with horrific civil cases needing adjudication.

However, rural judges and attorneys have long had a better understanding of what wildlife means to the people of the state and have pursued convictions citing the crimes. I don’t know any over-worked wildlife officer eager to spend time testifying in court when that could be spent teaching the positive aspects of wildlife management, but here it was time well spent.