CPW gets its poacher: Californian pinned with wildlife crimes

Here is something we can’t hear often enough: Colorado Parks and Wildlife stuck a California poacher with a pile of wildlife violations and now he faces not only big-time fines but also the potential loss of his hunting and fishing privileges.

Read the press release here.

According to CPW, Kyle Odle, 29, of Menifee, Calif., not only is an egregious repeat offender (many of the charges against him include the words “multiple counts”) but a Marine veteran who falsified his status as a vet to assist in committing wildlife crimes.

After reading the litany of charges against this clown, it’s hard to figure out if there is any  wildlife interest he didn’t offend. Properly licensed hunters, both resident and nonresident? Check. Vets? Check. Landowners? Check. Guides and outfits? Check. Biologists and mule deer conservation groups trying to restore Colorado’s mule deer? Check. License agents? Check. And so on.

Odle was sentenced to pay around $11,000 in fines (plus a $5,500 reimbursement to hunters he cheated by pretending to be a legal guide) and, pending a hearing, may lose his hunting and fishing privileges for life in this and 42 other states.

That he escaped jail time for potential felony charges is a pity since he deserves some time alone. Not that he would likely spend it thinking of where he went wrong, but sticking a felony charge (and its restrictions on owning firearms) on his record would insure he wouldn’t be able to hunt again.

The finding of the 14th Judicial District Court in Moffat County comes as good news because getting convictions on wildlife crimes has never been easy. Especially so in metropolitan areas where courts have backed-up dockets filled with horrific civil cases needing adjudication.

However, rural judges and attorneys have long had a better understanding of what wildlife means to the people of the state and have pursued convictions citing the crimes. I don’t know any over-worked wildlife officer eager to spend time testifying in court when that could be spent teaching the positive aspects of wildlife management, but here it was time well spent.

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